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Home Is My Haven Where Life Is For Enjoying And Is Worth Living Fully



The baby’s are so precious



Yesterday I was able for the first time to get pictures of our chicks. I’ve been waiting to see how many we had before disturbing & distressing the girls. These are my Cochin’s who seem to love the communal hatch,when one goes broody they all go broody within days of each other this time 3 of the 4 wanted to set & this time all in one oval galvanized planter I gave them to lay their eggs in,though there are two other planters in which they each could have had their own  nesting area but of course that’s not how it’s done in my cochin’s world. It’s heart warming but can making checking on the new arrivals & the condition of the nesting material impossible for one person to successfully do so, though the breed is small in stature & weight it’s difficult holding 3 hens wanting to get back to their nests by any means possible so I’ve been checking them every other day after Donnie gets home from work where if need be he can hold 2 while I have the other 1 & doing what I must quickly to get them settled once more.Yesterday afternoon I decided to lessen the possibility of more chicks by removing the remaining eggs still needing to hatch after finding several in the nest completely hatched & seeming to be a day or 2 old smashed by the weight of the hens or may be cramped quarters I’m really not sure but with this being the second hatch since spring has sprung adding 10 more to the flock, I thought it best to just allow them to care for the young they now have. When these chicks are big enough to roost & if the hens go broody quickly after as they did this time I’m going to slip a couple of Maran eggs under them removing their eggs completely. I now have more than I need at this moment seeing I’m not culling my cockerels unless they outnumber the pullets.

On another note


I believe it was Thursday when I went into the Maran coop to feed when I was flogged by one of the two full size rooster’s we’ve been needing to cull but haven’t found the time or we were wanting to hold off until absolutely necessary. Thursday was the day it became absolutely necessary. The rooster’s would fight among themselves but had never came towards either of us in an aggressive manner until Thursday when as I bent over putting their pan of feed down one flogged my left arm not once but twice hitting the elbow & the upper part of the arm apparently hitting a nerve in the elbow & muscle of the upper arm leaving me unable to lift my arm & in great pain but still able to move my fingers & hand.I left the coop to access my arm & to thoroughly clean the scratches & puncture wounds. I called Donnie to tell him what had happened & while on the phone with him I went back in the coop to hopefully identify the rooster giving the roo the benefit of  the doubt that I may have over stepped my territory.I needn’t look too far because as soon as I stepped in the coop he came running rushing me once again this time flogging my right leg.Putting the phone down when I  heard


I’ll be there as quickly as I can.”

The second unprovoked attack


With the second unprovoked attack I was madder than an ole wet hen & was head strong on catching him even if that meant one handed, which I just happened to grab him by his neck on my second try & removed him from the coop.Needless to say he was hanging on to his life by a thread when Donnie arrived. After accessing my wounds & scratches cleaning them all once again & applying ice because the muscle of the upper arm & elbow were now inflamed & swelling with the added scratch from under the knee to the ankle. I dont know if I happened into the coop after a rooster quarrel or if that day was the day for being stupid. It ended with having 2 of the rooster’s culled leaving enough for the amount of hens we have creating a more harmonious settled flock. Later that evening I was able to bend my elbow but not without pain,I kept icing it down & bending it a little at a time as the entire arm would spasm shooting pain into my hand. I soaked in a hot bath of Epsom salt for a least 15 minutes then went & laid down to rest it not wanting to put it in a sling. Around midnight I was finally able to bend my arm as usual & lift it above my head but of course not without pain which lasted into Saturday. Today I noticed the upper arm muscle is still very tender from the puncture wounds but no pain.He did hit the nerve at the elbow for a puncture wound was found there. When a  rooster attacks I always put them down,I never want to endanger myself or other’s by leaving them in the flock or rehoming them.I have found with all you do to try to break this behavior sooner or later an attack will happen again where they will need to be culled & put down. It’s all part of life on a homestead. You’ll have moments of great excitement of new life happening before your eyes to having to do what one must to ensure the safety for yourself & all around you,to the senseless deaths of smashed chicks. Tho it is how it is I wouldn’t stop having animals to love & care for,it’s part of who I am & what I love doing.

A duck goes into hiding


We have 19 ducks all together purchasing 18 from tractor supply with losing one,these being added to the 2 Rouen females we had from the year before when the neighbors Labrador bred & trained for waterfowl took down all but 4 ducks & a pair of geese,then later our Boxer/ labrador mix took down the goose & 2 ducks leaving us with a gander & 2 ducks hens,this causing us to rehome the dog.The 3 girls lived happily together until the goose became mean attacking every human & animal within it’s range of it’s reach so she was culled leaving the 2 duck hens who helped raised the ducklings purchased this year only after they spent weeks in our home in the brooder box setup. One of the duck hens has gone broody with me trying to discourage her because there’s no way the eggs are fertile. I have found several different places she’s hidden & without success she’s still broody tho now I can’t find where her nest is causing us to believe it’s in the tree line or wooded area. We are visited by her every two days for her to meet up with the other hen & they visit us on the back porch for a bite of dog food as they politely quack their thank you’s & head for the pond where we then lose track of her,only knowing she’s  AWOL at night when she doesn’t return to roost. When the eggs start giving off a terrible odor I’m sure she will return as fast as she can😂. I’m hoping for a drake or 2 in this new batch we purchased this year & hopefully her next broody time will not be wasted. I have empathy for little momma wanting some young & give it to her for her determination but I worry that something may attack her while out of the coop at night.


If it weren’t for our animals it probably wouldn’t be that exciting around here.There’s always something happening on a homestead & it usually involves an animal 😊.
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2 Replies to “Our new arrivals”

  1. The chicks are adorable. You seem to have a wealth of experience and such love for these animals. I often say it in the blog with regards to my little potagère and can really here it in your words. This is heaven. This is pre fall Eden. Perfect.

    1. I am an animal lover pure & simple 🙂 with out an animal of some sort I’m not happy. If it be dogs,goats,rabbits,chickens,calves or ducks. I acquired my dad’s love for animals and gardening tho I wish I would have paid more attention in terms of his skill with gardening while he were still with me. As a child & into my teens we had a small farm where we raised several calves & hogs to butcher each year along with chickens for the freezer & for eggs,along with a milk cow. We also had horses for riding. When my children were in their teens I raised milk goats,chickens,a couple of sheep, a pot bellied pig & a couple calves for the freezer. I love babies of all sorts human & animal.I don’t believe there’s anything that brings more joy than a baby something or other in my life. It’s exciting to find new life in the hen house. I have had more hatched this year with the purchase of the cochin breed & I’m excited to see how many I will eventually have in all. I read they are a broody breed but did not expect this tho I am tickled. 😉 I have been blessed with ten chicks having been hatched but a few did not survive. After all the years of raising this or that I’m still unable to take a loss of one very well,i seem to wonder what i could have done differently, if anything at all. P.s. I tend to always blame myself ( tho it’s not always my fault lol ) how are things with your animals?

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